Eighth Notes and Writing Challenges

Hey!

I can hardly believe that October is almost here.  For the last several years, I have participated in a writing challenge during the month of October.  Now that the start date is looming in 6 days, I’m starting to get antsy.  Even now, as I am thinking about what I will write, my foot is tapping staccato eighth notes in allegro.

I have a working topic but I’m struggling with finding the time to actually pull it together.  I’ll announce on Monday. {That’s a great idea; put it off for a few more days -hehehe!}

Until then, if you didn’t get a chance to see my posts from the past two years, you can check them out below.  Just click on either button and it will take you to the 31 Day Series page.  From that location, you can view any or all to your heart’s content.

2012

Day 25 of 31 Days of Books off my Shelf

2013

31 Day Button 2013.001

See you on Friday for Friday Finds #3!

Blessings,

Mimi

“Train me in good common sense; I’m thoroughly committed to living your way.”  Psalm 119:66 The Message

Has the South lost it’s identity?

Hey!  I’m glad you’re here!  This post is part of a 31 Day writing challenge hosted by The Nester.  During the month of October, I’m writing on Southern A Way of Life.  I will be back to my ‘regular’ posts in November.  Consider pushing that follow button to the right for all my latest posts.  Thanks y’all!

31 Day Button 2013.001Day 31

As I wrote the posts for this series, I began to ponder:  Have we, the South, lost our identity?   I don’t know if I can fully answer that question.  I know that the South that I experienced as a child is not the South of today.   That being said, I do live in a more urban environment than I did as a child, so perhaps, my impression is slightly altered.

Like everywhere, progress improves some things in a way you wish it didn’t and sometimes, you don’t realize it until, what was there is gone.  Global homogenization.  That’s what the experts call it.  The pundits who watch and assess our culture.

The South has prided itself on being set apart and having it’s own identity.  I’m hoping that we will retain those things that make us unique and not lose the essence of who we are.  I’m, also, hoping that we will continue to let go of those things that have tarnished and damaged us as a culture and move forward stronger than ever.

To celebrate Halloween, I have a blooper video for you today.

We have covered a lot of ground in the last 31 Days.  If you would like to catch up on all the posts in this series from the very beginning, click here.

Thank you, dear reader, for dropping in and spending your precious time with me.  I really appreciate it.  You make my day : )

What’s your take on global homogenization?

Blessings,

Mimi

“Watch out for false prophets.  They come to you in sheep’s clothing, but inwardly they are ferocious wolves.”  Matthew 7:15  NIV Bible

Potluck

Hey!  I’m glad you’re here!  This post is part of a 31 Day writing challenge hosted by The Nester.  During the month of October, I’m writing on Southern A Way of Life.  I will be back to my ‘regular’ posts in November.  Consider pushing that follow button to the right for all my latest posts.  Thanks y’all!

31 Day Button 2013.001Day 30

Only one more day and the challenge is over.  I’ve had such a good time sharing my South with you and making videos with my daughter and on occasion, daughter-in-law.  I hope you’ve had fun, too.

Throughout the series, I’d write a post and then realize, I’d forgot to mention something.   The video, today, is a potluck of things I forgot to mention and as diverse as a wonderful church supper on the grounds.  And truth be told, I probably still forgot tons of things.  I guess, you’ll just have to come South and check it out for yourself. : )

To view all of the posts in this series, click here

Blessings,

Mimi

“The grace of our Lord Jesus Christ be with you all.”  2 Thessalonians 3:18 NIV Bible

Family Ties

Hey!  I’m glad you’re here!  This post is part of a 31 Day writing challenge hosted by The Nester.  During the month of October, I’m writing on Southern A Way of Life.  I will be back to my ‘regular’ posts in November.  Consider pushing that follow button to the right for all my latest posts.  Thanks y’all!

31 Day Button 2013.001Day 29

When southerners talk about things that are important in their lives, they list faith and family near the top.  Families, in the South, don’t include only the immediate family but all of the extended family, too.   Many grow up knowing all of their relatives on both sides.  I thought I’d show you mine today.

IMG_1987Honey do and me

IMG_1432My son and sweet daughter in law

IMG_1419

My daughter and sweet son in law

IMG_1438  My parents
scan0021Some of my extended family on my sideParents 50th 078This picture is a little old but this is my family on Honey Do’s side.
They live in Wisconsin — it’s a long way from the South.

To view all of the posts in this series, click here

What do you think about the importance of family?

Blessings,

Mimi

“For whoever does the will of my Father in heaven is my brother and sister and mother.”  Matthew 12:50  NIV Bible

Weddings and Funerals: Southern Style

Hey!  I’m glad you’re here!  This post is part of a 31 Day writing challenge hosted by The Nester.  During the month of October, I’m writing on Southern A Way of Life.  I will be back to my ‘regular’ posts in November.  Consider pushing that follow button to the right for all my latest posts.  Thanks y’all!

31 Day Button 2013.001Day 28

I don’t know if southern weddings and funerals are any different than the rest of the country.  They’re big affairs even if they’re small.

Southern weddings have changed, since I was a bride almost 30 years ago, but they still retain many of the traditions.  Typically, the bride’s parents pay for anything associated with the wedding like the dress, the church, flowers and the reception while the groom’s parents pay for the rehearsal dinner and the honeymoon.  The groom picks out and pays for the rings.  Prior to the wedding, brides register at local stores, have wedding showers and bridal portraits taken.  The wedding, sometimes, includes family traditions like the bride wearing her mother’s veil.  Moms are concerned with the amount of food being enough for the reception and inviting and telling everyone to come so no one is left out.

Obviously for funerals, the focus is different.  When someone dies, everyone brings the family food.  Casseroles, banana bread and chocolate cake are quite often foods taken.  One peculiarity, I think done in the South that is not done other places, is the respect shown towards a funeral procession.  If you are driving down a road and a funeral procession passes, custom is to pull over to the shoulder in respect as the procession goes by.   Much debate on this issue, some believe the practice to be outdated, dangerous and not necessary.  Others feel, depending on the location when encountering the procession, the practice is good manners, respectful and not a problem.

These ladies have written a guide to Delta funerals with recipes.  The book has some really funny moments; particularly, the chapter on who has the best food, the Episcopal or the Methodist ladies.  On a side note, the chocolate cake recipe is yummy.

To view all of the posts in this series, click here

What kind of affairs do you have where you live?

Blessings,

Mimi

“Let us rejoice and be glad and give him glory!  For the wedding of the Lamb has come, and his bride has made herself ready.”  Revelation 19:7  NIV Bible

The Bible Belt

Hey!  I’m glad you’re here!  This post is part of a 31 Day writing challenge hosted by The Nester.  During the month of October, I’m writing on Southern A Way of Life.  I will be back to my ‘regular’ posts in November.  Consider pushing that follow button to the right for all my latest posts.  Thanks y’all!

31 Day Button 2013.001Day 27

The term “Bible Belt” was coined in 1924 by H.L. Mencken, a journalist and social commentator for the Chicago Daily Tribune, in reference to the religious South.  Generally speaking, the term refers to socially conservative Christian Protestants found in the South and parts of the Midwest.  I have to admit, I was pleased to see that on a 2010 Gallup Poll (here) that reported on the states’ attendance at church, 9 out of the top 10 states were southern and my state was #1.  It was really nice to see my state get top billing for something good.  Typically, we are on the bottom.

Church is an important component in our society.  It’s a place of friend building and networking, not only a place of spiritual growth.  When meeting a southerner for the first time, within the first 5 questions, the person will be asked, “What church do you go to?” or “Do you have a church?”   Some might find this line of questioning off-putting, but to a southerner, the question is really about connecting that person to something and helping us understand and know that person better.

I can’t imagine my life without church.  Spiritually speaking, I like being connected to a community of believers who encourage me, inspire me, and hold me accountable in my faith journey.  I like the nourishment that I find for my spirit there.  Socially, most of my friends and activities are church centered.  I’m just a church girl.

To learn more about religion in America, Hartford Institute for Religion Research has all you need to know at this site, click here.

To view all of the posts in this series, click here

What church do you go to?  How important do you think church /faith is to a society?

Blessings,

Mimi

“They stood where they were and read from the Book of the Law of the LORD their God for a quarter of the day, and spent another quarter in confession and in worshiping the LORD their God.”  Nehemiah 9:3  NIV Bible

Literary South

Hey!  I’m glad you’re here!  This post is part of a 31 Day writing challenge hosted by The Nester.  During the month of October, I’m writing on Southern A Way of Life.  I will be back to my ‘regular’ posts in November.  Consider pushing that follow button to the right for all my latest posts.  Thanks y’all!

31 Day Button 2013.001Day 26

Are you a reader?  I am.  Quite often, I’m reading several books at a time.  Last year for the 31 Day series, I shared some of my favorite books which you can find listed here.  The hardest part of last year’s series was trying to choose which books to showcase.

The South has a rich literary community and it’s culture, landscape and people have inspired a treasure trove of fascinating tales.  The first southerner to win the pulitzer prize for fiction was Julia Peterkin for her novel, Scarlet Sister Mary.   Her book was considered so scandalous that it was banned from one of the libraries in her home state.

I’ve compiled a list of books for you that I’ve enjoyed by writers from the South.  I had a hard time culling this list down.  I hope that you will give these talented southerners a try.   If I didn’t list your favorite, please share it in the comments.  I love hearing about new books to read.

         Southern Writers List
  1. To Kill A Mockingbird      Harper Lee
  2. A Redbird Christmas      Fannie Flagg
  3. All Over But The Shoutin’  Rick Bragg
  4. Their Eyes Were Watching God   Zora Neale Hurston
  5. A Streetcar Named Desire    Tennessee Williams
  6. Go Down, Moses       William Faulkner
  7. One Writer’s Beginnings    Eudora Welty
  8. Jubilee   Margaret Walker Alexander
  9. Ellen Foster   Kaye Gibbons
  10. The Help   Kathryn Stockett
  11. My Dog Skip   Willie Morris
  12. The Testament  John Grisham
  13. Track of the Cat   Nevada Barr
  14. Cold Sassy Tree   Olive Ann Burns
  15. The Gift of the Magi   O.Henry
  16. Walking Across Egypt   Clyde Edgerton
  17. When the Heart Waits   Sue Monk Kidd
  18. The Immortal Life of Henrietta Lacks    Rebecca Skloot
  19. At Home in Mitford     Jan Karon
  20. We’re Just Like You Only Prettier: Confessions of a Tarnished Southern Belle  Celia Rivenbark

To view all of the posts in this series, click here

What have you read lately?

Blessings,

Mimi

“They read from the Book of the Law of God, making it clear and giving the meaning so that the people could understand what was being read.”  Nehemiah 8:8  NIV Bible